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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ten years of onchocerciasis control in West Africa found in the catalog.

Ten years of onchocerciasis control in West Africa

Onchocerciasis Control Programme.

Ten years of onchocerciasis control in West Africa

review of the work of the Onchocerciasis ControlProgramme in the Volta River Basin area from 1974 to 1984.

by Onchocerciasis Control Programme.

  • 54 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by World Health Organization in [Geneva?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Onchocerciasis Control Programme.

  • ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14357902M

    (Onchocerciasis control program in Chad:the Mectizan donation) Sante Jan-Feb , 8 (1) Philippon B; Seketeli A. Genese de l'OCP et situationde l'onchocercose en Afrique occidentale avant les mesures de controle.(The beginning of the OPC and the status of onchocerciasis in western Africa before control measures) Sante Jan-Feb , 8 (1) p Settlement of the Valleys Protected from Onchocerciasis after Ten Years of Vector Control in Burkina Faso. Geography of Onchocerciasis Blindness in Northern Cameroon. NEW ONCHOCERCIASIS FOCI IN SOUTH AMERICA. Onchocerciasis in the Sierra Parima and Upper Orinoco Regions, Federal Territory of Amazonas, Venezuela.

    Health Condition: Onchocerciasis, or riverblindness, afflicts approximately 42 million people worldwide, with well over 99 percent of its victims in sub-Saharan estimated , people are blind and an additional million Africans are visually impaired due to onchocerciasis. In 11 West African countries in , nearly 2 million of the area’s 20 million inhabitants were. Report of a WHO expert committee on onchocerciasis control. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser 1– 2. World Health Organization, Onchocerciasis (river blind-ness). World Health Organ Fact Sheet No. 3. World Health Organization, Success in Africa: The On-chocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa,

    The Onchocerciasis Control Program (OCP) has helped to facilitate the elimination of onchocerciasis in large regions of 11 West African countries. Trachoma is a bacterial infection occurring in approximately 20 million persons living in the developing regions of Africa, the .   Onchocerciasis, also known as river blindness, is a disease caused by infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. Symptoms include severe itching, bumps under the skin, and blindness. It is the second-most common cause of blindness due to infection, after trachoma.


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Ten years of onchocerciasis control in West Africa by Onchocerciasis Control Programme. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Spraying continued for at least 14 years to break the life-cycle of the parasite. Ivermectin treatment was added to the control operations following the donation of ivermectin (Mectizan®) by Merck & Co., Inc.

in The 11 countries covered by Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP). Onchocerciasis control programme in West Africa Article (PDF Available) in Chemosphere 17(2) December with 20 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): This document while not constituting a formal publication may be freely abstracted, quoted, translated or used in any form for non-profit making purposes.

However, prior permission should be obtained from the Onchocerciasis Control Programme of the World Health Organization and appropriate acknowledgement made. Ten years of Onchocerciasis Control in West Africa, Report OCP/GVA/B, WHO (), p.

Cited by: Success in Africa: The Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa, [World Health Organization] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Success in Africa: The Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa, Author: World Health Organization.

Onchocerciasis, also known as river blindness, is a disease caused by infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. Symptoms include severe itching, bumps under the skin, and blindness. It is the second-most common cause of blindness due to infection, after trachoma.

The parasite worm is spread by the bites of a black fly of the Simulium type. Pronunciation: /ˌɒŋkoʊsɜːrˈsaɪəsɪs, -ˈkaɪ-/. The Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) started operations in Its main objectives were to eliminate human onchocerciasis, as a disease of public-health importance and an.

Introduction. Due to the socioeconomic impact of human onchocerciasis (commonly referred to as river blindness) in West Africa, the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin (OCP) was instituted [].This initial programme started in and covered seven West African countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, Niger, and by: Ended December The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) was a very successful African based partnership organization that includes 31 NTD endemic countries and communities, development partners, NGDOs, foundations and private sector for the last fifteen years.

Onchocerciasis control in Africa. Date: 14–15 July Venue: Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) which closed in December played a critical role in the control of onchocerciasis (river blindness) The WHO Regional Office for Africa is hosting the event to mark the success of the programme.

The Global Partnership to Eliminate River blindness announced Friday that US$39m has been pledged by donors to wipe out Onchocerciasis, more commonly known as River Blindness, in Africa by Over the last 30 years a large international partnership has successfully attacked onchocerciasis.

This partnership has defeated the disease in 10 of the 11 countries in West Africa and is making progress in the remaining endemic countries in central Africa and East Africa.

The program, spanning 30 countries across Sub-Saharan Africa, encompasses more than projects to create a. The Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa: an example of effective public health management. [Ebrahim M Samba; World Health Organization.] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

Search. Search # Onchocerciasis--Africa, West\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema. Onchocerciasis has been an important public health problem in tropical Africa, Latin America, and the Yemen with over 40 million people infected before the launch of large-scale control and an at-risk population of over million of which more than 99 % live in Africa [1–4].Thirty-one countries in Africa - 20 which are participating countries of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Cited by: The book is written in a clear, instructive language.

It has two parts. The first part gives a detailed account of the history, structure, operation and achievements of the Onchocerciasis Control Program, starting with the unique features of onchocerciasis as both a disease and an impediment to socioeconomic : Magid Halim. The Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) started operations in Its main objectives were to eliminate human onchocerciasis, as a disease of public-health importance and an obstacle to socio–economic development, from the Programme by:   An estimated 25 million people are currently infected with onchocerciasis (a parasitic infection caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus and transmitted by Simulium vectors), and 99% of these are in sub-Saharan Africa.

The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control closed in December and the World Health Organization has established a new structure, the Expanded Cited by: 6. Required duration of combinedannual ivermectin treatment andvectorcontrol in the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in WestAfrica A.P.

Plaisier,1 E.S. Alley,2 G.J. van Oortmarssen,3 B.A. Boatin,4 & J.D.F. Habbema5 In the extension areas of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in. West Africa covers an area of about one-fifth of the continent, or 6, sq km. The northern part of the region is a semi-arid terrain, south of the Sahara Desert.

The southern part is covered by savannahs. The total population of West Africa exceeds million. The most populous country is Nigeria with million inhabitants (). Get this from a library. Success in Africa: the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa, [Helen Bynum; World Health Organization.; Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa.].

life years (DALYs) have been averted by APOC through community-directed treatment with ivermectin, representing more than 55% of all DALYs that would otherwise have been lost in the APOC countries without treatment.

Executive summary 3 African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control • Revitalising health care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa.Title: Ten years of onchocerciasis control in West Africa: review of the work of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin area from to art and heritage in West Africa.(Review) (book reviews) Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.The onchocerciasis control program in West Africa: a long-term commitment to success (English) Abstract.

Onchocerciasis is a devastating African parasitical disease that causes severe debilitation and intense itching. By the time its victims are in their late twenties, Author: Bernard H.

Liese, John Wilson, Bruce Benton, Douglas Marr.